Farmwest Admin's blog

Manure Spreading Advisory #3 for 2016: South Coast Region

Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs. Manure applications for cover crops and newly seeded grasses should be based on a soil test and only applied if the cover crop will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended. Manure should not be applied within 8 meters of ditches or watercourses. Buffer width should be increased for slopes greater than 5% and/or if the potential for runoff exists. Consider wind speed and direction when applying manure and how it can have a negative impact on your neighbours. The wind can also increase ammonia loss and soil loss through erosion. Reminder that field-stored solid agricultural wastes (except vegetation waste) must be covered as of October 1. Please read the entire advisory for details and important information regarding manure applications.

Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2016: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 of 2016 (April 4, 2016) for the current Advisory. The following Update does not change the Advisory. · Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs. · When cropping after corn, cover crops or grassland planted after September 1 should not receive manure unless the need for nitrogen has been proven by a soil test. There is usually enough nitrogen remaining in the soil for a cover crop or newly seeded grass. · Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended unless cover crops are planted and will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. · As the chances of wet and rainy conditions increase in September, guidelines for setbacks for manure spreading increase from 5 m (as per the current advisory) to 8 m from ditches or watercourses. · Plan manure applications to empty storage facilities before the rainy season

BC Forage Council Climate Change Adaptation Project 2014-2017 (2016 Update)

  • Kale as a winter feed source
  • Late season grasses as winter feed and the effect of passive fertilization
  • Forage quality, yield and maturity rates of 6 alfalfa varieties
  • Determine optimum alfalfa seeding rate and seed mix

Kale as a winter feed source. Last year, the farmer grew one variety of kale (late maturing). We found that the kale grew very well and kept its nutritional qualities till late in the season (December 17 – Relative Feed Value of 425).