Advisories

Manure Spreading Advisory #4 for 2018: South Coast Region

The Manure Spreading Advisory Committee (consisting of industry and government representatives) is advising against manure applications due to lower air temperatures, the increased potential of significant rain events, and lack of vegetative cover and/or reduced nutrient uptake of cover crops. The committee will monitor weather and soil conditions and will issue further advisories as conditions change. Principal environmental risks associated with manure application:

Read Full Story Here

OCTOBER Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 of 2018: South Coast Region

For the past two years, significant rainfall started by mid-October in the Fraser Valley, above the long term average (see Figure 1 below). Forecasts may provide some indication as to what can be expected this year, better to plan and be prepared in advance of the rainy season when manure applications are not recommended.

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #3 for 2018: South Coast Region

Date: September 1, 2018
  • Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs.
  • Manure applications for cover crops and newly seeded grasses should be based on a soil test and only applied if the cover crop will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended.

Read Full Story Here

July UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 of 2018: South Coast Region

Considerations for spreading manure during warm weather: When spreading manure during the summer, it is important to consider the impact of high temperatures on nitrogen (N) loss from manure. Volatilization of ammonia during and shortly after application is greatly increased when temperatures are high. Several other factors including manure composition, time to incorporation, wind, soil pH and moisture, and application method will impact ammonia loss as well. Losing ammonia from manure is a direct loss of its fertilizer value and should be considered when planning application timing and calculating manure’s contribution to crop N requirements. Spreading manure when temperatures are above 25°C can result in a loss of 50% of the ammonia N within three hours of application.

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #2 for 2018: South Coast Region

  • Well planned manure applications are acceptable on most fields that are seeded, will be seeded within two weeks, and/or well-established grasses. 
  • Avoid manure applications on wet fields and/or saturated soils.
  • It is the producer’s responsibility to apply manure in a manner that will not create runoff to surface water, to off field locations, and/or leaching below the root zone
  • Do not apply manure prior to significant rain events. 

Read Full Story Here

April UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2018: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2018 (Mar 16, 2018) for the current Advisory
 
From the current Advisory:
“It is acceptable to apply manure on established grasses, fields being seeded within two weeks of application, and berry fields IF:
• Expected precipitation and manure applications will NOT create nutrient or pathogen runoff to surface water (by overland flow or through tile drains)*
• T-Sum value in your area is greater than 200,

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #1 for 2018: South Coast Region

It is acceptable to apply manure on established grasses, fields being seeded within two weeks of application, and berry fields IF: Expected precipitation and manure applications will NOT create nutrient or pathogen runoff to surface water (by overland flow or through tile drains)* T-Sum value in your area is greater than 200, Soil temperature is greater than 5oC, and Crop is actively growing (for established crops only)

Read Full Story Here

March UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 of 2017: South Coast Region

“in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.” With the T-sum value hovering near 200 in several areas across the Fraser Valley, it is important to remember the other factors to consider before a forage field is suitable for spreading manure.

Read Full Story Here

February UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 of 2017: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 of 2017 (Nov 1, 2017) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.” The following Update does not change the Advisory. The T-Sum is one factor used to determine appropriate timing for the first manure application on grass fields. More importantly, however, decisions about the first manure application should consider the overall risks of runoff from the field, not just the state of the grasses. On some but not all fields, conditions will be suitable for manure application before T-Sum reaches 200. On other fields, conditions will not be suitable even after T-Sum reaches 200 (e.g. if fields are still saturated from rains). T-Sum values, a sum of daily mean temperatures above 0°C, for the region are listed below and compared with values for the same time last year and the historical average.

Read Full Story Here

Pages