Farmwest Blog

January UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory

In general, manure application is not advised until further notice. See Advisory #4 (Nov 4, 2013) for recommendations concerning management practices. The T-Sum is one consideration for deciding when new manure spreading advisories get released. However, because weather conditions vary from place to place, so does T-Sum and how quickly it increases. More information about the T-Sum can be found here: http://www.farmwest.com/climate/tsum

Read Full Story Here

Locally Produced Craft Beer, Wine, Cider and Spirits for Sale at BC Farmers' Markets

The British Columbia Association of Farmers' Markets (BCAFM) is pleased to announce that in the near future, locally produced craft beer, wine, cider and spirits will be allowed for sale at BC Farmers' Markets.

Read Full Story Here

December UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4

Re: Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2013: South Coast Region December 2, 2013

Read Full Story Here

MANURE SPREADING ADVISORY #4 2013: South Coast Region

In general, manure application on any crops is not advised until further notice. See below for advice on avoiding overflowing manure pits. Grasses grew for a long period this year as they took up nitrogen (N) from past manure applications. This is because of delay between N release from manure into the soil and crop N uptake from soil. The delay from the slow-release or ‘organic’ portions of manure N lasts days, weeks, and years. Waiting till next year to spread will increase the nutrient value of the manure for your crop. Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading, but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution. Please read the entire advisory for details and important information to assist producers with decision-making about manure application.

Read Full Story Here

COOL FORAGES - Advanced management of temperate forages 2013

The new forage book published by the Pacific Field Corn Association is now available.  The book covers Ecosystem Services of Forage, Growth of Forage, Forage Diversity, Breeding New Forage Varieties, Soil Nutrients, Managing Waste, and Forage Quality and Feeding.  To order this book, please email pfca@farmwest.com

Read more in the Farmwest Library ... Cool Forages 2013

Read Full Story Here

Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica) (2013)

Are You Harbouring an Aggressive Alien Invader in Your Garden?

Read Full Story Here

October UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 2013: South Coast Region

Field-stored solid agricultural wastes (except vegetation waste) must be covered from October 1 to April 1, inclusive. See Manure Spreading Advisory #3 (released Sep 3, 2013) for more information about how weather conditions and other factors influence manure applications.

Read Full Story Here

Cool Forages - Advanced Management of Temperate Forages 2013

What the experts are saying ... "… what an absolute delightful take on forages!" ~ Perry Miller, Montana State University; "Outstanding!" ~ Matt Sanderson, Research Leader, USDA-ARS

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #3 2013: South Coast Region

* Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs. * Manure applications for cover crops and newly seeded grasses should be based on a soil test and only applied if the cover crop will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended. * Manure should not be applied within 8 meters of ditches or watercourses. Buffer width should be increased for slopes greater than 5% and/or if the potential for runoff exists. * Consider wind speed and direction when applying manure and how it can have a negative impact on your neighbors. The wind can also increase ammonia loss and soil loss through erosion. * Reminder that field stored solid agricultural wastes (except vegetation waste) must be covered by October 1.

Read Full Story Here

COOL FORAGES - PREFACE: Are Forages Green?

The perceived ‘greenness’ and sustainability of forages is not without merit. More than anyother crop, forages are protective of the environment, thanks to massive root systems, long periods of growth and year-round ground cover. Forages shield the soil against salinization and degradation by erosion and subsidence. In fact forages, more than any crop, build soils by furnishing abundant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) from their ample roots, and even more so if livestock waste is returned. Forages provide for an elaborate and diversified soil ecosystem and food web, replete with both small and minute soil organisms, by enhancing soil structure, conserving nutrients, and nourishing with carbohydrate exuded from roots, and indirectly from applied manure. Forages protect the freshness of streams and lakes by reducing surface runoff and leaching. They may reduce emissions of greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide by sequestering C and N, and they improve air quality by reducing dust emissions that often come from tillage and wind erosion. Forages also emit a pleasing scent to the air, and provide nectar and pollen for beneficial insects. Forages may reduce the need for pesticides and mineral fertilizers. And, finally, forages provide feed and habitat for birds and wildlife. Natural grassland biomes (defined broadly) occupy 40% of the land surface of the earth (excluding Greenland and Antarctica) in the form of savannahs, prairies, steppes, cerrado and pampas (www.fao.org). And a new forage biome, of sorts, has emerged world-wide in recent centuries, comprising anthropogenic (seeded) grasslands that have often replaced forests and natural grasslands. Managed grasslands with high residency compared to natural grasslands feed many of the ruminants that provide humans with meat, milk, recreation, power and materials. Managed grasslands are also used by a variety of wildlife and, occasionally, by ‘free ranging’ pigs and chickens.

Read Full Story Here

Pages