Advisories

  • February UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2015: South Coast Region

    Date: February 1, 2016

    Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2015 (November 2, 2015) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.”

    TSum as of Feb 1, 2016 :

    • North Delta 131
    • Langley Central 127
    • Chilliwack n/a*
    • Surrey East 150
    • Abbotsford Airport 120
    • Agassiz 133
      *n/a, data may not be reliable

    Watch the T-Sum for your area increase at Farmwest.com. The T-Sum is one factor used to determine appropriate timing for the first manure application on grass fields. More importantly, however, decisions about the first manure application should consider the overall risks of runoff from the field, not just the state of the grasses. On some but not all fields, conditions will be suitable for manure application before T-Sum reaches 200. On other fields, conditions will not be suitable even after T-Sum reaches 200 (e.g. if fields are still saturated from rains).

    Learn about the T-Sum: http://www.farmwest.com/node/937

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For general information on manure spreading, please contact the BC Ministry of Agriculture: David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098

    Contact the BC Ministry of Environment: Report a spill 1-800-663-3456
    Report activities that are polluting the environment 1-877-952-7277 (Report All Poachers and Polluters RAPP)

    Filed under: 
  • January UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2015: South Coast Region

    Date: January 4, 2016

    Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2015 (November 2, 2015) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.”

    Reminder

    Field-stored solid agricultural wastes (except agricultural vegetation waste) MUST be COVERED from October 1 to April 1, inclusive.

    The wording in the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation is as follows: “In areas of the Province, including the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island, that receive a total average precipitation greater than 600 mm (24 in) during the months of October to April inclusive, field stored solid agricultural wastes, except agricultural vegetation waste, must be covered from October 1 to April 1 inclusive to prevent the escape of agricultural waste that causes pollution.”

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For general information on manure spreading, please contact the BC Ministry of Agriculture:
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    Contact the BC Ministry of Environment: Report a spill 1-800-663-3456 Report activities that are polluting the environment 1-877-952-7277 (Report All Poachers and Polluters RAPP)

    Filed under: 
  • December UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4

     Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2015 (November 2, 2015) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.”

    The following information could be considered for spring manure applications in 2016. If solid broiler manure or litter cannot be injected or incorporated into a perennial grass sward, the next best strategy to reduce nitrogen losses is applying when the grass is taller (Table 1). Co-benefits include odour reduction, reducing risk of runoff and increasing nutrient uptake.

    Table 1. Losses of nitrogen (N) from surface-applied broiler litter decrease with grass height. The N is lost to the air (volatilized) from the ammonium (NH4) fraction of the broiler litter.

    Grass heighta

    % of NH4 losta

    NH4 losta

    Value of lost NH4b.

    27.5 cm (tallest)

    50%

    45 lb N/ac

    $34/ac

    17.5 cm

    66%

    59 lb N/ac

    $44/ac

    7.5 cm

    67%

    60 lb N/ac

    $45/ac

    2.5 cm (shortest)

    72%

    65 lb N/ac

    $49/ac

     

    a. Broiler litter was applied at 420 lb N/ac (total N), of which 90 lb N/ac was NH4-N. Source: Bittman et al. (2013). “Grass Height Affects Emission of Ammonia from Applied Broiler Manure" in Cool Forages - Advanced Management of Temperate Forages.The NH4 losses were measured 14 days after application to an established orchardgrass sward. The bulk application rate was not specified but is likely close to 6 to 8 tons/ac of broiler litter.

    b. The dollar value was estimated based on the data from Bittman et al. (2013), assuming a cost of $0.75/lb of N in fertilizer (i.e. about $750 per tonne of 46-0-0).


    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

     

    For general information on manure spreading, please contact the BC Ministry of Agriculture:

    David Poon, P.Ag                                                      604-556-3098

    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag                                  604-556-3102

    Contact the BC Ministry of Environment:

    Report a spill 1-800-663-3456

    Report activities that are polluting the environment 1-877-952-7277 (Report All Poachers and Polluters RAPP)

     

    Filed under: 
  • Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2015: South Coast Region

    Date: November 2, 2015

    In general, manure application on any crops is not advised. See below for advice on avoiding overflowing manure pits.

    What is the concern with spreading manure now? Although a manure application now, under the most favourable conditions, may lead to a growth spurt of grass (Fig. 1), most of the nitrogen in manure that would be spread now will be leached and lost from the soil during the cold, rainy season, before the grass can use it (Fig. 2). Advice: don’t just feed the microbes, feed the crop by waiting to apply manure.

     manure N
    Figure 1. What likely happens with nitrogen (N) if manure is spread now, assuming soils are not yet cold and there is no leaching.

    manure N

    Figure 2. What is likely to happen with nitrogen (N) in the weeks after the time period described in Figure 1.

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading, but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    Please read the entire advisory for details and important information to assist producers with decision-making about manure application.

    This advisory is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    The Manure Spreading Advisory Committee (consisting of industry and government representatives) is advising against manure applications due to lower air temperatures, the increased potential of significant rain events, and lack of vegetative cover and/or reduced nutrient uptake of cover crops. The committee will monitor weather and soil conditions and will issue further advisories as conditions change.

    Principal environmental risks associated with manure application

    • surface runoff of manure nutrients and pathogens to water courses
    • short-circuit flow of manure nutrients and pathogens to water courses though drain tiles
    • soil compaction from operating heavy equipment on fields that are very wet


    Manure Storage

    • Winter manure applications are not recommended. It is essential to have enough manure storage to include the average expected precipitation plus account for unforeseen circumstances such as excessive precipitation.
    • Develop a contingency plan to outline an effective response in case of an emergency. The plan should include identification of abandoned pits and other storage facilities, contact information for vacuum trucks or commercial operators, and easy access to the provincial spill reporting hotline: 1-800-663-3456.


    Harvested Annual Crops (including corn and vegetables)

    • Manure applications are not recommended until further notice.


    Berry crops

    • Manure applications are not recommended until further notice.


    Perennial Grassland

    • Winter manure applications are not recommended. All measures must be taken to address the chance of overflowing manure storage (see Manure Storage above). If manure storage is not adequate and overflowing might occur please contact one of the following staff for additional manure management advice:
    • David Poon, Ministry of Agriculture (604) 556-3098
    • Geoff Hughes-Games, Ministry of Agriculture (604) 556-3102


    Agricultural Waste Control Regulation This is the legislation that applies to manure management in British Columbia. http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/10_131_92

    Canada-BC Environmental Farm Plan Program
    Trained Planning Advisors are available to assist producers with an Environmental Farm Plan. For more information contact the ARDCorp office in Abbotsford.
    toll free 1-866-522-3447 or 604-854-4483 http://www.bcac.bc.ca/ardcorp/program/environmental-farm-plan-program

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