Advisories

  • August UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2014: South Coast Region

    Date: August 1, 2014

    • Plan ahead: There’s less risk of manure or nutrient loss with 2 light manure applications (1 now, 1 later) than with 1 heavy application closer to the rainy season.
    • Manure Spreading Advisory #2 (March 10, 2014) is still current: Adivsory #2

    July’s Update was about the imbalance of nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) in manure relative to crop requirements. One strategy to address the imbalance is to use mineral N fertilizer to fulfill part of the crop requirement. Advantages of mineral N fertilizer over manure include:

      • Particularly in cool and wet years, the N release from mineral fertilizer is more reliable
      • Application is more even, ensuring all parts of a field receive enough N
      • Unnecessary P additions can be avoided for soils with high amounts of soil test P

    But if manure application is reduced, where would the unused manure go?
    Scientists at Agassiz, BC have been looking at ways to answer this and better use the N and P in dairy manure (while reducing the need for starter phosphorus fertilizer).

    VIDEO: Making the most of dairy slurry: the dual manure stream concept (24 minutes) http://goo.gl/Xv3hDj

     Evaluation of the concept on commercial farms is still in the early stages. Stay tuned.

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

     

     

    For more information, contact BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature, contact BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Filed under: 
  • July UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2014: South Coast Region

    July 2, 2014

    Continue to refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 (March 10, 2014) for managing risks with manure spreading:  http://www.farmwest.com/node/1342

     Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For more information, contact BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature, contact BC Ministry of Environment:
    George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Assumptions about Manure Nutrient Contents

    The following nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations were used to estimate the amount of P for every 100 kg total N in 3 manure types: Manure Type Total N (%, as received) Total P (%, as received) N : P ratio Liquid dairy (quite watery) 0.20 0.04 5.0 : 1 Broiler chicken 3.47 1.09 3.2 : 1 Hog (covered pit) 0.63 0.14 4.5 : 1

    Filed under: 
  • May UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2014: South Coast Region

    Do you know the nitrogen (N) fertilizer value of manure?

    • Example: A farmer broadcasts 45,000 L per hectare (4,000 imperial gallons per acre) of liquid manure in the spring. The N fertilizer value of this manure, in the year of application, depends largely on the total N and ammonium-N contents of the manure:

    Manure
    (% total N, % ammonium-N)

    Equivalent N amount (kg/ha)

    Value at $1.25/kg N

    Value at $1.50/kg N

    Dairy, liquid (0.13% N, 0.07% NH4-N)

    25

    $31/hectare

    $38/hectare

    Dairy, slurry (0.28% N, 0.15% NH4-N)

    40

    $50/hectare

    $60/hectare

    Hog, liquid (0.35% N, 0.26% NH4-N)

    70

    $88/hectare

    $105/hectare

    Your manure (?)

    ?

    ?

    ?

    Manure

    (% total N, % ammonium-N)

    Equivalent N amount (lb/ac)

    Value at $0.57/lb N

    Value at $0.68/lb N

    Dairy, liquid (0.13% N, 0.07% NH4-N)

    22

    $13/acre

    $15/acre

    Dairy, slurry (0.28% N, 0.15% NH4-N)

    36

    $20/acre

    $24/acre

    Hog, liquid (0.35% N, 0.26% NH4-N)

    62

    $36/acre

    $43/acre

    Your manure (?)

    ?

    ?

    ?

    See the next page for the assumptions about N losses and availability.

    •  Reliable estimates come from analyses of your manure (see the April 1 Update).

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution. This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Assumptions used to estimate equivalent fertilizer nitrogen (N) amounts (see above)

    • Application of manure at 45,000 L per hectare (4,000 imperial gallons per acre)
    • Total N and ammonium (NH4) N contents on an as-received basis o Dairy, liquid (98% water): 0.13% N; 0.07% NH4-N o Dairy, slurry (94% water): 0.28% N; 0.15% NH4-N o Hog (96% water): 0.35% N; 0.26% NH4-N o Actual values vary from farm to farm
    • Ammonia (NH3) loss: percentage of NH4 lost to the air was estimated using the Ammonia Loss calculator (http://www.farmwest.com/climate/ammonia) with the following assumptions:: o Broadcast by splashplate with no incorporation, at an air temperature of 10°C and no wind o Dairy, liquid (98% water): 43% loss of NH4 o Dairy, slurry (94% water): 62% loss of NH4 o Hog (96% water): 49% loss of NH4
    • Mineralization: 25% of the organic N transforms into plant-available form in the year of application. In manure, organic N is Total N minus NH4-N. Additional notes
    • The above excludes the N value of manure in the 2nd and 3rd year after manure application. The N is temporarily stored in soil organic N and released in the 2nd and 3rd years.
    • The value of phosphorus (P) or potassium (K) in manure depends on P or K levels in the receiving soil: the greater the soil test P or K, the less is the value of the manure P or K in general.
    Filed under: 
  • April UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2014: South Coast Region

    April 1, 2014

    Do you know the nutrient content of your manure?

    • You can find a lab that will analyze your farm’s manure for total nutrient contents that will vary somewhat from the averages (Table 1). Find a list of laboratories here: http://goo.gl/ntuZqP
    • A fraction of the total nutrients has fertilizer value in the year of application, particularly in the case of nitrogen. Another fraction has fertilizer value in subsequent years. For general information about how large the fractions are, see Question 4 in the Q & A document here (http://goo.gl/rqdEjz).

    Table 1. Average nutrient contents (% as-received) of some manures. The Ministry of Agriculture and its partners are currently updating these values with local data to provide better reference information.

    Manure Type

    Total Nitrogen (N)
    (%)

    Total Phosphorus (P)
    (%)

    Total Potassium (K)
    (%)

    Liquid dairy >98% water (very watery)

    0.13

    0.02

    0.12

    Liquid dairy 95-98% water (quite watery)

    0.20

    0.04

    0.16

    Broiler 25% water

    3.47

    1.09

    1.29

    Hog 93% water (covered pit)

    0.63

    0.14

    0.33

    Hog 98% water (uncovered pit)

    0.35

    0.07

    0.14

     

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

     This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

     For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag                                                      604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag                                  604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature:  BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag                                604-582-5211

    Filed under: 
  • Manure Spreading Advisory #2 for 2014: South Coast Region

    March 10, 2014

    • Well-planned manner applications are acceptable on most fields that are seeded, will be seeded within two weeks, or have well-established grasses.
    • Do not apply manure prior to significant rain events to avoid nutrient runoff and leaching. Please check your local weather forecast and see the next page for more information.
    • Avoid manure applications on wet areas or saturated soils. Some fields will dry more quickly than others.
    • Please continue to check you have enough manure storage to hold the average expected precipitation plus any excessive precipitation.
    • Field-stored solid agricultural wastes (except agricultural vegetation waste) MUST be COVERED from October 1 to April 1, inclusive.

    Please read the entire advisory for details and important information to assist in the decision-making process for manure application(s) and storage.

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag. 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag. 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag. 604-582-5211

    Additional Information

    Manure Storage

    • Develop a contingency plan to outline an effective response in case of an emergency. The plan could include identification of nearby abandoned pits, contact information for vacuum trucks, and easy access to the provincial spill reporting hotline. • A review of beneficial management practices (such as those found in the Environmental Farm Plan Reference Guide) may help identify improved management practices to alleviate storage issues.

    Established Grasses

    • Manure may be applied throughout the growing season to meet crop nutrient uptake.
    • Avoid spreading on wet fields and saturated soils.
    • Plan manure applications to ensure that storage facilities will be as close to empty as possible by next October.
    • Do not apply manure within 5 meters or more of wet ditches or watercourses. Increase buffer width to avoid any contaminated runoff based on soil, soil cover conditions, slopes greater than 5%, and sensitivity of the area being protected.

    Berry and Vegetable Crops

    • Do not spread manure on berry fields between flowering and harvest or on vegetable fields after planting.
    • The use of properly composted manure should be considered if food safety issues related to manure applications are a concern and/or if nutrient leaching is a concern in sensitive areas such as unconfined aquifers.
    • Verify your food safety plan or program requirements prior to manure and/or compost applications.

    Bare Fields and Fields Prior to Planting

    • Manure applications are not recommended unless the field will be seeded within two weeks of manure application.

    Additional Resources

    Filed under: 
  • March UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 2014: South Coast Region

    Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 2014: South Coast Region Date: March 3, 2014

      • In general, manure application is not advised this week.
      • Cold temperatures and snow or rain over the past weekend have delayed the start of acceptable conditions for manure spreading in most parts of the South Coast.
      • Without adequate drainage, finer-textured soils (e.g. clays and loams) are more likely to be wet, have surface runoff, warm up slowly, and be compacted than coarse-textured (sandy) soils, if all else is the same.
      • Expect the next Manure Spreading Advisory to be released next week when weather and soil conditions improve.
      • See http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/ManureAdvisory/index.htm for the most current information. 

     

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098 Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102 For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Filed under: 
  • Manure Spreading Advisory #1 for 2014: South Coast Region

    Date: February 3, 2014

    • It is acceptable to apply manure on established grasses, fields being seeded within two weeks of application, and berry fields if:
        •  T-Sum value in your area is greater than 200*,
        • Soil temperature is greater than 5oC,
        • Crop is actively growing (for established crops only), and
        • Expected precipitation and manure applications will not create nutrient runoff to surface water or leaching below the root zone. Please check your local weather forecast and see the next page for more information.
    • Please continue to check you have enough manure storage to hold the average expected precipitation plus any excessive precipitation.
    • Field stored solid agricultural wastes (except agricultural vegetation waste) MUST be COVERED from October 1 to April 1, inclusive.

     *T-Sum values as of Feb 3, 2014 in select locations:

    North Delta: 121                        Abbotsford: 129        Chilliwack: 169         Agassiz: 172

    Comox: 117                     North Cowichan: 148

    Please read the entire advisory for details and important information to assist in the decision-making process for manure application and storage.

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag. 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag. 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag. 604-582-5211

    Additional Information

    Manure Storage

    • Develop a contingency plan to outline an effective response in case of an emergency. The plan could include identification of nearby abandoned pits, contact information for vacuum trucks, and easy access to the provincial spill reporting hotline.
    • A review of beneficial management practices (such as those found in the Environmental Farm Plan Reference Guide) may help identify improved management practices to alleviate storage issues.

    Established Grasses and Fields Prior to Planting

    • Manure may be applied to a field of established grasses if all the following apply:

    1. T-Sum value in your area is greater than 200 (see http://www.farmwest.com/climate/tsum)
    2. Soil temperature is greater than 5oC measured at a soil depth of 10 cm
    3. Grass is actively growing
    4. A minimum buffer width of 8 meters (26 feet) is maintained between the application area and sensitive areas and watercourses including ditches
    5. Less than 10 mm of accumulated precipitation is expected for the 5 days following application
    6. The field is not frozen or saturated, subject to flooding or runoff, and it is not tile-drained with the potential for manure to leave the farm

    Berry crops

    • Manure may be applied in late February but it is recommended you confirm from your food safety plan or program to determine the time requirement between manure application and crop harvest.
    • The use of properly composted manure should be considered if food safety issues related to manure applications are a concern or if nutrient leaching is a concern in sensitive areas such as over unconfined aquifers.

    Additional Resources

    Filed under: 
  • January UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory

    Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2013: South Coast Region
    Date: January 7, 2014

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

      • In general, manure application is not advised until further notice
      • See Advisory #4 (Nov 4, 2013) for recommendations concerning management practices
      • The T-Sum is one consideration for deciding when new manure spreading advisories get released. However, because weather conditions vary from place to place, so does T-Sum and how quickly it increases (Table 1).

     

    Table 1. Historic T-Sum values on February 1 in BC South Coast locations.
    More information about the T-Sum can be found here: http://www.farmwest.com/climate/tsum  

    Weather station

    2013

    Long-term average

    Abbotsford

    83

    84

    Agassiz

    94

    93

    Comox

    98

    115

    N. Cowichan

    92

    113

    N. Delta

    67

    122

     

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact:  BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Filed under: 
  • December UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4

    Re: Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2013: South Coast Region December 2, 2013

    • In general, manure application is not advised until further notice
    • See Advisory #4 (Nov 4, 2013) for recommendations concerning management practices

     For those with manure application equipment and who are thinking ahead to next year, will you be calibrating your equipment? To be able to apply manure uniformly at desired rates, it is important to calibrate.

    • For the first calibration, water can be used as a clean alternative to liquid manures
    • In addition to the Ministry factsheet http://bit.ly/18pgtPT, you can find factsheets online from several other sources

    Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.

    This Update is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    For further information, please contact: BC Ministry of Agriculture
    David Poon, P.Ag 604-556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, P.Ag 604-556-3102

    For questions of a regulatory nature: BC Ministry of Environment
    George Rushworth, P.Ag 604-582-5211

    Filed under: 
  • MANURE SPREADING ADVISORY #4 2013: South Coast Region

    November 4, 2013

    • In general, manure application on any crops is not advised until further notice. See below for advice on avoiding overflowing manure pits.
    • Grasses grew for a long period this year as they took up nitrogen (N) from past manure applications. This is because of delay between N release from manure into the soil and crop N uptake from soil. The delay from the slow-release or ‘organic’ portions of manure N lasts days, weeks, and years. Waiting till next year to spread will increase the nutrient value of the manure for your crop.
    • Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading, but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution.
    • Please read the entire advisory for details and important information to assist producers with decision-making about manure application.

    This advisory is produced by government, in partnership with industry, to provide guidance to farmers regarding the Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and the ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ACT. If a discrepancy arises between this document and the legislation, the legislation takes precedence. Following this advisory does not relieve anyone from their obligations under the LEGISLATION. The Province of British Columbia does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information referenced here from legislation, and in no event is the Province liable or responsible for damages of any kind arising out of its use.

    The Manure Spreading Advisory Committee (consisting of industry and government representatives) is advising against manure applications due to lower air temperatures, the increased potential of significant rain events, and lack of vegetative cover and/or reduced nutrient uptake of cover crops. The committee will monitor weather and soil conditions and will issue further advisories as conditions change.

    Principal environmental risks associated with manure application

      • surface runoff of manure nutrients and pathogens to water courses
      • short-circuit flow of manure nutrients and pathogens to water courses though drain tiles
      • soil compaction from operating heavy equipment on fields that are very wet 

    Manure Storage

      • Winter manure applications are not recommended. It is essential to have enough manure storage to include the average expected precipitation plus account for unforeseen circumstances such as excessive precipitation. • Develop a contingency plan to outline an effective response in case of an emergency. The plan should include identification of abandoned pits and other storage facilities, contact information for vacuum trucks or commercial operators, and easy access to the provincial spill reporting hotline: 1-800-663-3456.

    Harvested Annual Crops (including corn and vegetables)

      • Manure applications are not recommended until further notice.

    Berry crops

      • Manure applications are not recommended until further notice.

    Perennial Grassland

      • Winter manure applications are not recommended.

    All measures must be taken to address the chance of overflowing manure storage (see Manure Storage above). If manure storage is not adequate and overflowing might occur please contact one of the following staff for additional manure management advice:

    George Rushworth, Ministry of Environment (604) 582-5211
    David Poon, Ministry of Agriculture (604) 556-3098
    Geoff Hughes-Games, Ministry of Agriculture (604) 556-3102
    Trevor Hamelin, Ministry of Environment (604) 582-5275

    Additional Resources

    Agricultural Waste Control Regulation
    This is the legislation that applies to manure management in British Columbia. http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/10_131_92

    Canada-BC Environmental Farm Plan Program
    Trained Planning Advisors are available to assist producers with an Environmental Farm Plan. For more information contact the ARDCorp office in Abbotsford. toll free 1-866-522-3447 or 604-854-4483 http://www.bcac.bc.ca/ardcorp/program/environmental-farm-plan-program BC Environmental Farm Plan Reference Guide provides valuable information related to farm management practices that enhance environmental values http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/EnviroFarmPlanning/EFP_Refguide/Refguid...

    Filed under: 

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